Teasers Betting Guide

Teasers Betting Guide

Regardless of whether you’re a savvy sports bettor or a total rookie in the game, you’re probably familiar with the idea of placing wagers on a given point spread. Well, teasers take this same concept of the point spread but apply it to multiple games (similar to a parlay). However, there’s also a slight twist to teasers, which we’ll dive deeper into below. 

What is a Teaser Bet? 

Teasers are another prevalent form of sports betting similar to your normal parlays, but with more control over the lines. Much like a traditional parlay, each leg must hit for the teaser to win. However, with teasers, you can add extra points to either team, allowing you to shift the odds more into your favor. Like a parlay bet, there is a reasonable amount of risk involved in that each game will have to be guessed correctly for the bet as a whole to succeed. But with teasers, you can help to mitigate the risk by shifting the odds in your favor. 

For example, imagine there are three bets that you just can’t seem to take your eyes off of. The Buffalo Bills (+3.5) over the Los Angeles Rams (-3.5), the Atlanta Falcons (+7.5) losing to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (-7.5), and the Tennessee Titans (+1.5) beating the Miami Dolphins (-1.5). Instead of betting on each game individually or in a parlay, you could make a three-team six-point teaser bet with the Bills at +9.5, the Bucs at -1.5, and the Titans at +7.5. To win the bet, you’ll need all three teams to cover. 

How to Bet on Teasers?

As previously mentioned, a teaser bet is a form of parlay betting that uses a modified point spread to properly analyze the strategy behind this unusual form of sports betting. We’ll need to take a closer look at some of the specifics. Firstly, you’ll want to mark down as many significant numbers as possible. Keep an eye out for things like the form of competing teams, and assess other factors such as home advantage and injuries. Key numbers are the most common victory margins or point totals in a game, with two of the biggest NFL key numbers being 3 and 7 (others include 6, 10, and 14).

Obviously, your odds of winning a teaser are much higher than winning a parlay, but this also means that the payout will not be nearly as big. Certainly still more than a straight bet, but nowhere near what you could have made from a parlay bet. There are certain advantages and disadvantages to all forms of sports betting, but teaser bets easily provide the most fun and exciting way to have some action in multiple games with a good shot at winning. 

The good news for sports, and betting fanatics alike, is that there are countless ways to place teaser bets nowadays, thanks to the rapid advancement of online sportsbooks in North America. Teasers are typically used in NFL betting and occasionally with the NBA and NCAA football and basketball, but they are certainly not designed for all sports. Also, teasers differentiate from parlays in that you can’t tease moneyline bets. Typically, you can only tease line spreads, totals, and over/under bets in most North American sports. Something to keep in mind as you’re on the hunt for profitable matchups. 

Tips for Teasers Betting 

Understand the Key Numbers

This point cannot be overstated. A massive part of any successful sports gambler’s portfolio is a healthy amount of relevant statistics and readily available information on the game at hand. Specifically, since most teasers are placed on NFL games, it would be wise to ensure that your bet crosses as many key numbers as possible. If you’re able to tease your bet down to below 3, then you’re set, so long as your team wins by 3 points, which is more than plausible given how NFL games typically go. 

Never Cross Through Zero 

Crossing a Zero is one of the most frowned upon mistakes a sports bettor can make with teasers. Essentially, you should never cross the zero midlines in any one of your bets (i.e., going from -5.0 to +5.0, +2.5 to -2.5, +1.5 to -4.0, etc.). This is because the most commonly used sports with teaser bets, football (NFL) and basketball (NBA), rarely end in a tie. So, if you tease across zero, then you’re paying for an outcome that will likely never happen, which is why it is seen as the worst teaser strategy and a waste of a point. 

Conclusion

There’s no question that teasers can be a tremendous way to put together a string of games that you would feel confident in with an additional point spread. Understand that your payout will be less than a traditional parlay since you’ll be altering the lines in your favor. But you’ll still be able to enjoy the same level of excitement as a conventional parlay, thanks to the “all-or-none” payout structure. Regardless, nobody can deny that teasers are a remarkable way to expand your betting arsenal and explore alternative ways to place bets on sports.

Regardless of whether you’re a savvy sports bettor or a total rookie in the game, you’re probably familiar with the idea of placing wagers on a given point spread. Well, teasers take this same concept of the point spread but apply it to multiple games (similar to a parlay). However, there’s also a slight twist…